In the $75 Billion Videogame Industry, Hiring People Is a Last Resort


#1

As outsourcing sweeps through almost every industry in the U.S., the videogame business looks a lot like the workplace of the future. A lean core of in-house employees focuses on the most important jobs, with the rest hired out to layers of contractors and subcontractors. Companies say the result is just-in-time production fueled with human capital. By outsourcing low-value work or renting high-value expertise needed for a short time, game makers like Psyonix can focus on what they do best.


#2

If it results in better quality games or even lowering the price of games, then I’m all for it. Freelance programming.


#3

I don’t have an issue with it. In fact, it mirrors the movie industry quite closely. This is how you create huge pieces of work in year-long stretches at scale.


#4

I’ve mentioned before that I want to open a game studio, probably going to contract out some concept art and maybe music. Seems like the logical way to do it.


#5

And then Mass Effect Andromeda happens.


#6

That’s where this model makes sense. It’s easy to ramp down after a huge project like that. Especially if your DLC revenue prospects have been hurt.


#7

I guess… But that just seems like you’re not confident of your product. Get the money before people realize the broken promises, ramp down quickly to let the public anger shift away, repeat.


#8

Do you get me wrong. I think the creators of rocket league are great, and if they do this and it works out, great. The problem is big studios that want to squeeze out a lean $@#& and have someone give them money for it. Ideally the consumer is the hard check on this kind of behavior, but we’ve proven that our attention spans are miniscule. People keep buying big name games who are more than happy to sacrifice quality for an extra dollar.

That’s why I trust Nintendo… Their currency is ¥…:stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye: